Too Long for Twitter

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Next on the agenda? College.

Every year seniors freak out: about college applications, which college to attend, will they get accepted, can they get one more point on their ACT, etc. And every year I hold a strong belief my students (really every student) will end up where they are supposed to be - at the college that is right for them, even though they may not realize it right off the bat. 

This article reminds me of this fact, and I hope it reminds you as well.  You, I would presume, aren’t living with dyslexia and aren’t applying to Middlebury College, but the point to me is this: colleges know what they are doing - they see things in students even when you don’t think you are presenting your very best.  Yes, every student is unique and special; every student is loved by their parents and teachers…. and every student has a shot…

Robert Frost said “College is a refuge from hasty judgement.”  So quit being so hasty with your self-judgement and take refuge in the fact that you have done everything “right” and your future - although currently unknown - is going to be more than great.

http://sites.middlebury.edu/middmag/2013/02/05/languge-in-depth-living-with-dyslexia/

Filed under middlebury college application essays dyslexia

26,929 notes

fairytalesfor20somethings:

Friends!
Big news! Penguin is publishing a book of my fairy tales called Alice in Tumblr-land: And Other Fairy Tales for a New Generation. Out 10/29!
From the inside flap:
"The Ugly Duckling still feels gross compared to everyone else, but now she’s got Instagram, and there’s this one filter that makes her look awesome. Cinderella swaps her glass slippers for Crocs. The Tortoise and the Hare Facebook stalk each other. Goldilocks goes gluten-free. And Peter Pan finally has to grow up and ge ta job, or at least start paying rent.
Here are more than one hundred fairy tales, illustrated and re-imagined for today. Instead of fairy godmothers, there’s Siri. And rather than big bad wolves, there are creepy dudes on OkCupid. In our brave new world of social networking, YouTube, and texting, fairy tales can once again lead us to ‘happily ever after’—and have us laughing all the way.”
!!!
It will be hardcover, with dust jacket, and fancy endpapers. Cream-colored, rough-edged pages.
240 pages of 150 illustrated fairy tales. Over 70% of the stories are new, and nearly every illustration is new.
Certain characters reappear throughout the book—like Alice, Peter Pan, and Cinderella—with an overarching narrative. So you can read it cover to cover and get the larger story, or you can open up to any page and find a laugh.
I tried really hard to make it something special. If you like what you’ve seen here, you’ll love the book. Ryan Gosling is on the first page, so.
I’ll be posting excerpts, new stories, behind-the-scenes videos and photos, and all sorts of other things—including contests to write or illustrate a fairy tale—in the next two months, so follow on Tumblr, Facebook, or Twitter.
I’m also gonna have some fun gifts for folks who pre-order, so reserve your copy now at Amazon, Barnes & Noble, Books-A-Million, IndieBound, oriTunes.
And I’ll say this many more times in the next two months, but: Thanks. It’s because you liked or shared this stuff that this book is happening. I can’t express my gratitude enough.
So much love,
Tim Manley
PS Please do share the news and book cover! And send me an email at fairytalesfor20somethings@gmail.com if you might want to help be a part of the super-secret street team spreading the word about the book, or if you just want to say hi!

fairytalesfor20somethings:

Friends!

Big news! Penguin is publishing a book of my fairy tales called Alice in Tumblr-land: And Other Fairy Tales for a New Generation. Out 10/29!

From the inside flap:

"The Ugly Duckling still feels gross compared to everyone else, but now she’s got Instagram, and there’s this one filter that makes her look awesome. Cinderella swaps her glass slippers for Crocs. The Tortoise and the Hare Facebook stalk each other. Goldilocks goes gluten-free. And Peter Pan finally has to grow up and ge ta job, or at least start paying rent.

Here are more than one hundred fairy tales, illustrated and re-imagined for today. Instead of fairy godmothers, there’s Siri. And rather than big bad wolves, there are creepy dudes on OkCupid. In our brave new world of social networking, YouTube, and texting, fairy tales can once again lead us to ‘happily ever after’—and have us laughing all the way.”

!!!

It will be hardcover, with dust jacket, and fancy endpapers. Cream-colored, rough-edged pages.

240 pages of 150 illustrated fairy tales. Over 70% of the stories are new, and nearly every illustration is new.

Certain characters reappear throughout the book—like Alice, Peter Pan, and Cinderella—with an overarching narrative. So you can read it cover to cover and get the larger story, or you can open up to any page and find a laugh.

I tried really hard to make it something special. If you like what you’ve seen here, you’ll love the book. Ryan Gosling is on the first page, so.

I’ll be posting excerpts, new stories, behind-the-scenes videos and photos, and all sorts of other things—including contests to write or illustrate a fairy tale—in the next two months, so follow on Tumblr, Facebook, or Twitter.

I’m also gonna have some fun gifts for folks who pre-order, so reserve your copy now at AmazonBarnes & NobleBooks-A-MillionIndieBound, oriTunes.

And I’ll say this many more times in the next two months, but: Thanks. It’s because you liked or shared this stuff that this book is happening. I can’t express my gratitude enough.

So much love,

Tim Manley

PS Please do share the news and book cover! And send me an email at fairytalesfor20somethings@gmail.com if you might want to help be a part of the super-secret street team spreading the word about the book, or if you just want to say hi!

0 notes

To Kill A Mockingbird - Students’ Opinions

These are some of my favorite student thoughts I’ve ever read about TKAM.

——————————————————————————————————————-

  • TKAM “shines a light onto what is right in life.” Sheldon B.
  • "As long as one race hates another, Harper Lee’s novel will never be outdated." Austin O.
  • "Anyone with a heart would be touched by the story of the Finch family." Emily S.
  • "Boo is just like anybody else except with a bigger heart." Morgan G.
  • "How someone cannot love this book and fall in love with the characters is mind blowing." Morgan G.
  • "If anyone reads this book, they would have a hard time not getting wrapped up in it." Morgan S.
  • "TKAM is relatable to any time period & any age." Danielle L.
  • "This book should go down as one of the best books ever." Kyle D.
  • "The morals and lessons that Atticus teaches still need to be learned in today’s society." Gabe B.

Filed under To Kill A Mockingbird Love Great Reads opinions

0 notes

Check out these sites…

I am so proud of my seniors’ Lord of the Flies’  projects!  Please check out these fantastic websites - and don’t worry, you won’t have a LotF overdose - the topics really vary.

http://jchenso9.wix.com/bullying

http://mackenziemartin2013.wix.com/mentaldisorderskids

http://scruffysorah.wix.com/personality-traits

http://english17.wix.com/worthy-of-65-points

http://vaj423.wix.com/industry-of-outrage

Filed under websites projects bullying mob mentality the state of education personality traits mental health

4 notes

Lord of the Flies & WWII/Holocaust Connections

For Golding, who served as a naval officer during the war, “Belsen and Hiroshima and all the rest of it” provided proof of the depths to which humans could sink.

  • The boys land on the island in the first place because they are being evacuated from a war zone.  In keeping with 1950s anxiety about atomic weapons, Golding makes it a nuclear war… However, it is Britain’s most recent war, WWII, that is uppermost in Golding’s mind.
  • After the defeat of the Nazis and the revelation of atrocities, the question everyone - not only Golding - was asking was, “How could this have happened?”  How could people have permitted someone like Hitler to come to power, and how could they have gone along with him once they saw what he was doing with his powers.

Character parallels:

  • Jack as Hitler - he implies he will only rule those he deems worthy…  you should count the other numerous ways. 
  • Ralph as Britain’s prewar prime minister, Neville Chamberlain, who let Hitler invade the Sudetenland in the hope that it would stop there.
  • Or - Ralph as Germany’s pre-Nazi government  which failed to understand the danger represented by giving the Nazis any sort of power at all.
  • Piggy as the Jews & other “undesirables” persecuted by Hitler’s regime. (**Follow his treatment & compare it to the Jews’.)
  • Roger as the Gestapo (Hitler’s secret police) or SS (who ran the concentration camps) - because he revels in violence.
  • Samneric as the decent Germans cowed by fear and torture.
  • The littleuns and unnamed older boys are the great mass of people, the ones influenced by a mixture of fear, desire for glory, greed, and sheer unwillingness to stand up for anything.

**directly quoted (and slightly paraphrased, with a few additional comments) from a chapter called “War and Postwar” in the book Literature in Context: Lord of the Flies by Kirstin Olsen.

Filed under literature LotF Holocaust WWII Golding

960 notes

11 Wonderful Words With No English Equivalent

amandaonwriting:

1. Seigneur-terraces (French)
Coffee shop dwellers who sit at tables a long time but spend little money.

2. Ya’arburnee (Arabic)
This word is the hopeful declaration that you will die before someone you love deeply, because you cannot stand to live without them. Literally, may you bury me.

3. Schlimazel (Yiddish)
Someone prone to bad luck. Yiddish distinguishes between the schlemiel and schlimazel, whose fates would probably be grouped under those of the klutz in other languages. The schlemiel is the traditional maladroit, who spills his coffee; the schlimazel is the one on whom it’s spilled.

4. Packesel (German)
The packesel is the person who’s stuck carrying everyone else’s bags on a trip. Literally, a burro.

5. L’esprit de l’escalier (French)
Literally, stairwell wit—a too-late retort thought of only after departure.

6. Hygge (Danish)
Denmark’s mantra, hygge is the pleasant, genial, and intimate feeling associated with sitting around a fire in the winter with close friends.

7. Spesenritter (German)
Literally, an expense knight. You’ve probably dined with a spesenritter before, the type who shows off by paying the bill on the company’s expense account.

8. Cavoli Riscaldati (Italian)
The result of attempting to revive an unworkable relationship. Literally, reheated cabbage.

9. Bilita Mpash (Bantu)
An amazing, pleasant dream. Not just a “good” dream; the opposite of a nightmare.

10. Litost (Czech)
Milan Kundera described the emotion as “a state of torment created by the sudden sight of one’s own misery.”

11. Murr-ma (Waigman, language of Australia)
To walk alongside the water while searching for something with your feet.

by Romy Oltuski 

Filed under language